September 1, 2014

hanrahanrahan:

Always strive for a well-phrased melody, no matter what else your hands have to deal with. Imagine the keys are covered with small snails. Let the melody soar.

September 1, 2014

fluffyfit:

surimistick:

i was making a lot of mistakes and then my archery instructor said:

“you make mistakes because you’re focusing on the target and not on your actions”

and i was like woah

thanks for giving me the best life advice i’ve ever gotten

guys just think about how applicable this is to EVERYFUCKINGTHING

What’s amazing is that both this advice (focus on your immediate actions) and its exact opposite (focus on the big-picture target goal) are equally true and equally necessary to master any skill. Wisdom is being able to hold contradictory ideas in your mind at the same time.

(via pianoguy6789)

September 1, 2014
"There are so few notes,” the pianist Leon Fleisher said, “but so many implications.” The setting was a recent master class at Carnegie Hall. Fleisher, … was speaking about the Andante movement of Schubert’s B-Flat-Major Sonata … “There are so few notes, but the implications go back billions of years,” Fleisher went on. “You have to be like the Hubble Space Telescope, which sees stars as old as the universe. The stars are dead, but their light is reaching us just now."

— Alex Ross quoting Leon Fleisher
The Sonata Seminar - The New Yorker

2:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zi1ncx1PmaIb9
  
Filed under: piano 
September 1, 2014
"The central work is Bach’s Chaconne in D Minor for violin, arranged as a left-hand piano exercise by Brahms. In a letter to Clara Schumann, Brahms told of his love for the Chaconne—“a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings”—and said that he enjoyed struggling in solitude to execute it with one hand, because “one does not always want to hear music actually played.” The miracle of Fleisher’s account is that, while he performs with astonishing dexterity, he retains that atmosphere of exploration, as if no one were listening. The most wrenching passage in the Chaconne comes toward the end, when, after an upward-striving, light-seeking section in D major, there is a shuddering collapse back into the minor. Here, as sonorous, multi-register figuration gives way to spare, confined lines, you may remember what you might have forgotten, that the pianist is using one hand, and that the impairment of the other has caused him much sorrow."

Alex Ross covers Leon Fleisher’s latest record in his New Yorker column this week.

Fleisher has struggled for years with focal dystonia that impairs playing with his right hand.

What’s Lost When the Cloud Replaces CDs

2:29pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zi1ncx1PmYPvy
  
Filed under: piano 
September 1, 2014

"But it wasn’t just a technical approach towards the piano, studying the music for this film was also a way of approaching the soul of the film, because the film is really about the soul of Schubert and the soul of Bach."
- Isabelle Huppert speaking about preparing for her role in Michael Haneke’s movie “La pianiste”.

(Source: youtube.com)

August 31, 2014

opus109:

Hello again!  In case you were wondering what I named this blog after, this is it!  

I still remember the first time I ever heard this piece - its really burned into my memory.  I walked into the piano department to find my professor and an older student watching a performance of Claudio Arrau playing op. 109 on a vhs.  The performance was absolutely arresting.  I was changed forever.

August 31, 2014
lifeofacrazyhermit:

Life is hard

lifeofacrazyhermit:

Life is hard

August 29, 2014

amelie-moreau:

24 Préludes de Chopin interprété par Sofronitsky

August 29, 2014
"Maria Yudina is remembered for her personal interpretations of Bach and Beethoven. Banned from performing in public because of her religious views, she was the favourite pianist of Joseph Stalin. One night, Stalin heard a performance of a Mozart concerto on the radio performed by Yudina and asked for a copy. It was a live broadcast so officials woke up Yudina, drove her to a recording studio where a small orchestra had quickly been assembled, and made her record the concerto in the middle of the night, a single copy was pressed from the matrix and then presented to Stalin." 
(via Some Favourite Pianists: Part Three - Practising the Piano)

"Maria Yudina is remembered for her personal interpretations of Bach and Beethoven. Banned from performing in public because of her religious views, she was the favourite pianist of Joseph Stalin. One night, Stalin heard a performance of a Mozart concerto on the radio performed by Yudina and asked for a copy. It was a live broadcast so officials woke up Yudina, drove her to a recording studio where a small orchestra had quickly been assembled, and made her record the concerto in the middle of the night, a single copy was pressed from the matrix and then presented to Stalin."
(via Some Favourite Pianists: Part Three - Practising the Piano)

August 29, 2014

scriabinist:

Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.

Samuel Beckett, “Worstward Ho”